Disparate stakeholder management: the case of elk and bison feeding in southern Greater Yellowstone

Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal
By: , and 

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Abstract

For resource decisions to make the most possible progress toward achieving agency mandates, managers must work with stakeholders and may need to at least partially accommodate some of their key underlying interests. To accommodate stakeholder interests, while also substantively working toward fulfilling legal mandates, managers must understand the sociopolitical factors that influence the decision-making process. We coin the phrase disparate stakeholder management (DSM) to describe situations with disparate stakeholders and disparate management solutions. A DSM approach (DSMA) requires decision makers to combine concepts from many sciences, thus releasing them from disciplinary bonds that often constrain innovation and effectiveness. We combined three distinct approaches to develop a DSMA that assisted in developing a comprehensive range of elk and bison management alternatives in the Southern Greater Yellowstone Area. The DSMA illustrated the extent of compromise between meeting legal agency mandates and accommodating the preferences of certain stakeholder groups.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Disparate stakeholder management: the case of elk and bison feeding in southern Greater Yellowstone
Series title Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal
DOI 10.1080/08941920.2012.701371
Volume 26
Issue 3
Year Published 2012
Language English
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Publisher location London, England
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal
Country United States
State Wyoming
Other Geospatial Yellowstone National Park