Tampa Bay as a model estuary for examining the impact of human activities on biogeochemical processes: an introduction

Marine Chemistry
By: , and 

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Abstract

Tampa Bay is a shallow, Y-shaped coastal embayment that is located along the center of the Florida Platform – an expansive accumulation of Cretaceous–Tertiary shallow-water carbonates and evaporites that were periodically exposed during glacio–eustatic sea level fluctuations. As a consequence, extensive karstification likely had a controlling impact on the geologic evolution of Tampa Bay. Despite its large aerial size (∼ 1000 km2), Tampa Bay is relatively shallow (mean depth = 4 m) and its watershed (6700 km2) is among the smallest in the Gulf of Mexico. About 85% of all freshwater inflow (mean = 63 m3 s-1) to the bay is carried by four principal tributaries (Orlando et al., 1993). Groundwater makes up an important component of baseflow of these coastal streams and may also be important in delivering nutrients and other constituents to the bay proper by submarine groundwater discharge.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Tampa Bay as a model estuary for examining the impact of human activities on biogeochemical processes: an introduction
Series title Marine Chemistry
DOI 10.1016/j.marchem.2006.12.009
Volume 104
Issue 1-2
Year Published 2007
Language English
Publisher Elsevier
Contributing office(s) Coastal and Marine Geology Program
Description 3 p.
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Marine Chemistry
First page 1
Last page 3
Country United States
State Florida
City Tampa Bay
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