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The importance of biological surveys in managing public lands in the western United States

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Abstract

Despite previous studies, incomplete knowledge of the mammalian fauna of many national parks hinders our ability to understand the consequences of either management actions of natural disasters to such preserves. Faunal losses have occurred and can be expected to continue (Newmark 1986a, 1986b). our studies in and near Dinosaur National Monument, one of the parks studied by Newmark (1986a, 1986b), have added 11 species to the known fauna. Some species have increased with human impact; other species have either disappeared or are declining. Finally, many species, which are uncommon and poorly known, may have rather specific habitat needs.

Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype Other Report
Title The importance of biological surveys in managing public lands in the western United States
Series number General Technical Report RM-166
Year Published 1988
Language English
Publisher U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
Publisher location Fort Collins, CO
Description 8 p.
Larger Work Type Report
Larger Work Subtype Other Report
Larger Work Title Proceedings of the symposium on management of amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals in North America
First page 254
Last page 261
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