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Douglas-fir forests in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon and Washington: is the abundance of small mammals related to stand age and moisture?

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Abstract

Red tree voles (Arborimus longicaudus) were the only small mammal strongly associated with old-growth forests, whereas vagrant shrews (Sorex vagrans) were most abundant in young forests. Pacific marsh shrews (S. bendirii) were most abundant in wet old-growth forests, but abundance of this species in young (wet) forests needs further study. Clearcuts had a mammalian fauna distinct from young forest stands. Abundance of several species was correlated to habitat features unique to naturally regenerated forests, indicated an urgent need to study the long-term effects of forest management to nongame wildlife.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype Other Report
Title Douglas-fir forests in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon and Washington: is the abundance of small mammals related to stand age and moisture?
Series number General Technical Report RM-166
Year Published 1988
Language English
Publisher U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
Publisher location Washington, D.C.
Description 13 p.
Larger Work Type Report
Larger Work Subtype Other Report
Larger Work Title Management of amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals in North America
First page 340
Last page 352
Country United States
State Oregon;Washington
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