The precarious persistence of the endangered Sierra Madre yellow-legged frog Rana muscosa in southern California, USA

Oryx
By: , and 

Links

Abstract

We conducted surveys for the Endangered Sierra Madre yellow-legged frog Rana muscosa throughout southern California to evaluate the current distribution and status of the species. Surveys were conducted during 2000–2009 at 150 unique streams and lakes within the San Gabriel, San Bernardino, San Jacinto, and Palomar mountains of southern California. Only nine small, geographically isolated populations were detected across the four mountain ranges, and all tested positive for the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Our data show that when R. muscosa is known to be present it is easily detectable (89%) in a single visit during the frog's active season. We estimate that only 166 adult frogs remained in the wild in 2009. Our research indicates that R. muscosa populations in southern California are threatened by natural and stochastic events and may become extirpated in the near future unless there is some intervention to save them.

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title The precarious persistence of the endangered Sierra Madre yellow-legged frog Rana muscosa in southern California, USA
Series title Oryx
DOI 10.1017/S003060531300029X
Volume 49
Issue 1
Year Published 2015
Language English
Publisher Oryx
Contributing office(s) Western Ecological Research Center
Description 8 p.
First page 157
Last page 164
Country United States
State California
Other Geospatial Palomar, San Bernardino, San Gabriel, San Jacinto Mountains
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N