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Three studies using Ceriodaphnia to detect nonpoint sources of metals from mine drainage

Research Journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation
By: , and 

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Abstract

Since its introduction, Ceriodaphnia dubia, a small planktonic daphnid, has been widely used for biomonitoring point source discharges. This species was also used to determine nonpoint sources of metals and related contaminants in three trout streams in the west where mining activities have been widespread. Along Chalk Creek, Colo., specific tailings (and impacted tributaries) were sources of metals toxic to fish using the water in a hatchery. At stations below extensive mine tailings in the upper Clark Fork River, Mont., drainage was acutely and chronically toxic to daphnids and paralleled reduced or nonexistent populations of trout. In Whitewood Creek, S. Dak., reduced toxicity below a gold mine portended that fish could live in the stream segment previously impaired by the mine. Toxicity downstream revealed a previously unknown nonpoint source of chromium.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Three studies using Ceriodaphnia to detect nonpoint sources of metals from mine drainage
Series title Research Journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation
Volume 62
Issue 1
Year Published 1990
Language English
Publisher Water Pollution Control Federation
Publisher location Alexandria, VA
Description 9 p.
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Research Journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation
First page 7
Last page 15