Sedimentology of Southwestern Roads region, U.S. Virgin Islands: origin and rate of sediment accumulation

Journal of Sedimentary Research
By: , and 

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Abstract

Sand deposits on southern insular shelf of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, were investigated to determine their origin, environmental processes and accumulation rates. Sea-floor samples show that the sand has been derived (in situ) mainly from calcareous algae and molluscs. Zonation of the dominant sand producers is related to the present environmental setting; water depth has the greatest influence. Carbon-14 data (bulk sample) of cores indicate accumulation rates of slightly less than 1 mm/year for the last 5,000 years. Faunal studies show that the climate has remained constant over the past 5,000 years. The only changes in environmental conditions appear to have been an increase in water depth, changes in the patterns of water movement, and an increase in water temperature.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Sedimentology of Southwestern Roads region, U.S. Virgin Islands: origin and rate of sediment accumulation
Series title Journal of Sedimentary Research
DOI 10.1306/212F8201-2B24-11D7-8648000102C1865D
Volume 53
Issue 2
Year Published 1983
Language English
Publisher American Geological Institute
Contributing office(s) Coastal and Marine Geology Program
Description 9 p.
First page 439
Last page 447
Country United States
Other Geospatial Virgin Islands
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N
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