Materials characterization of dusts generated by the collapse of the World Trade Center

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Abstract

The major inorganic components of the dusts generated from the collapse of the World Trade Center buildings on September 11, 2001 were concrete materials, gypsum, and man-made vitreous fibers. These components were likely derived from lightweight Portland cement concrete floors, gypsum wallboard, and spray-on fireproofing and ceiling tiles, respectively. All of the 36 samples collected by the USGS team had these materials as the three major inorganic components of the dust. Components found at minor and trace levels include chrysotile asbestos, lead, crystalline silica, and particles of iron and zinc oxides. Other heavy metals, such as lead, bismuth, copper, molybdenum, chromium, and nickel, were present at much lower levels occurring in a variety of chemical forms. Several of these materials have health implications based on their chemical composition, morphology, and bioaccessibility.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Materials characterization of dusts generated by the collapse of the World Trade Center
DOI 10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch005
Year Published 2009
Language English
Publisher American Chemical Society
Publisher location Washington, D.C.
Description 19 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Title Urban Aerosols and Their Impacts
First page 84
Last page 102
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N