Population differences in host immune factors may influence survival of Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys Gunnisoni) during plague outbreaks

Journal of Wildlife Diseases
By: , and 

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Abstract

Over the past 40 yr, epizootics of plague (Yersinia pestis) in northern Arizona have reduced populations of the Gunnison’s prairie dog (Cynomys gunnisoni), with the exception of a large population found in the Aubrey Valley (AV). To examine potential mechanisms accounting for their survival, we collected prairie dog serum samples in 2005–2006 from AV and a neighboring population near Seligman (SE), Arizona. We quantified gene expression at 58 diverse immune proteins using a multiplexed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay panel. We found a subset of proteins important in coagulation and inflammation (tissue factor [TF], calbindin [Cal], and thrombopoietin [TPO]) and T-cell responses (CD40L and CD40) that were present in AV at levels two to eight times greater than SE. These results suggest that AV and SE animals might differ in their ability to mount an immune response.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Population differences in host immune factors may influence survival of Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys Gunnisoni) during plague outbreaks
Series title Journal of Wildlife Diseases
DOI 10.7589/0090-3558-47.4.968
Volume 47
Issue 4
Year Published 2011
Language English
Publisher Wildlife Disease Association
Contributing office(s) National Wildlife Health Center
Description 6 p.
First page 968
Last page 973
Country United States
State Arizona
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N
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