Late Holocene flood probabilities in the Black Hills, South Dakota with emphasis on the Medieval Climate Anomaly

Catena
By: , and 

Links

Abstract

A stratigraphic record of 35 large paleofloods and four large historical floods during the last 2000 years for four basins in the Black Hills of South Dakota reveals three long-term flooding episodes, identified using probability distributions, at A.D.: 120–395, 900–1290, and 1410 to present. During the Medieval Climate Anomaly (~ A.D. 900–1300) the four basins collectively experienced 13 large floods compared to nine large floods in the previous 800 years, including the largest floods of the last 2000 years for two of the four basins. This high concentration of extreme floods is likely caused by one or more of the following: 1) instability of air masses caused by stronger than normal westerlies; 2) larger or more frequent hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean; and/or 3) reduced land covering vegetation or increased forest fires caused by persistent regional drought.

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Late Holocene flood probabilities in the Black Hills, South Dakota with emphasis on the Medieval Climate Anomaly
Series title Catena
DOI 10.1016/j.catena.2014.10.002
Volume 130
Year Published 2015
Language English
Publisher Elsevier
Contributing office(s) Volcano Hazards Program, Oregon Water Science Center
Description 7 p.
First page 62
Last page 68
Country United States
State South Dakota
Other Geospatial Black Hills
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N