Measuring storm tide and high-water marks caused by Hurricane Sandy in New York: Chapter 2

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Abstract

In response to Hurricane Sandy, personnel from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a temporary network of storm-tide sensors from Virginia to Maine. During the storm, real-time water levels were available from tide gages and rapid-deployment gages (RDGs). After the storm, USGS scientists retrieved the storm-tide sensors and RDGs and surveyed high-water marks. These data demonstrate that the timing of peak storm surge relative to astronomical tide was extremely important in southeastern New York. For example, along the south shores of New York City and western Suffolk County, the peak storm surge of 6–9 ft generally coincided with the astronomical high tide, which resulted in substantial coastal flooding. In the Peconic Estuary and northern Nassau County, however, the peak storm surge of 9 ft and nearly 12 ft, respectively, nearly coincided with normal low tide, which helped spare these communities from more severe coastal flooding.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Measuring storm tide and high-water marks caused by Hurricane Sandy in New York: Chapter 2
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-801520-9.00002-X
Year Published 2015
Language English
Publisher Elsevier Inc.
Publisher location Amsterdam
Contributing office(s) New York Water Science Center
Description 9 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Learning from the Impacts of Superstorm Sandy
First page 7
Last page 19
Country United States
State New York