A call for conservation scientists to evaluate opportunities and risks from operation of vertical axis wind turbines

Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution
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Abstract

A new conservation paradigm (Kareiva and Marvier, 2012) emphasizes the need for scientists to embrace a holistic approach taking into account the social and natural dimensions of conservation in human-dominated landscapes. While there is heavy debate over the new approach (Tallis and Lubchenco, 2014), most conservation scientists seem to agree on to the need to cooperate with corporations when such interaction can benefit people and the environment (Miller et al., 2014;Tallis and Lubchenco, 2014). Cooperation can be most productive when established in the early phases of development, but this requires a high capacity for forward looking pre-emptive action (i.e., anticipating potential forthcoming issues before they arise; Sutherland and Woodroof, 2009). This framework is particularly salient for rapidly developing and expanding technologies such as those for harvesting renewable energy sources. Here the stakes are very high, as they concern mitigating negative consequences to global climate while generating energy without impacting wildlife. In this vein, past experience is instructional. The environmental impacts of biofuels and wind, among others, have been identified and evaluated rather late (Sutherland and Woodroof, 2009), so that implementation of best management practices on existing facilities is now often prohibitively expensive.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title A call for conservation scientists to evaluate opportunities and risks from operation of vertical axis wind turbines
Series title Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution
DOI 10.3389/fevo.2015.00068
Volume 3
Year Published 2015
Language English
Publisher Frontiers Media
Contributing office(s) Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Description 3 p.
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N