Geometry and rates of change of fault-generated range fronts, north-central Nevada

Journal of Research of the U.S. Geological Survey
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Abstract

Characteristic features of fault-generated range fronts, such as those on the Humboldt and Tobin Ranges, include sets of elongate basins extending normal to the range crest, interbasin spurs having crests sloping 10° to 20° toward the range front, spur facets having slopes of 25° to 35°, basin headwalls having slopes of 20° to 30°, and a basal fault scarp. The basal fault scarp is rejuvenated by vertical movements recurring at intervals on the order of 10 000 years. Fault scarps in colluvium that lie within a few tens of meters of the base of faceted spurs remain clearly recognizable for only a few tens of thousand years. Initial fault-scarp slopes of 50° to 90° are replaced by debris-controlled slopes of 30° to 37° within a few thousand years. In fractured bedrock, slope angles in the range of 25° to 35° remain relatively stable for hundreds of thousands of years and account for the relative stability of facets on spurs. Piedmont slopes are greatly affected by tectonic tilting or warping toward or away from the range front. The formation of pediments is believed to result from a low ratio of uplift relative to downcutting. A few million years is required for the development of a pediment a few kilometers wide.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Geometry and rates of change of fault-generated range fronts, north-central Nevada
Series title Journal of Research of the U.S. Geological Survey
Volume 6
Issue 5
Year Published 1978
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Arlington, AV
Description 13 p.
First page 637
Last page 649
Country United States
State Nevada
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N
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