Examining wildlife responses to phenology and wildfire using a landscape-scale camera trap network

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Abstract

Between 2001 and 2009, the Borderlands Jaguar Detection Project deployed 174 camera traps in the mountains of southern Arizona to record jaguar activity. In addition to jaguars, the motion-activated cameras, placed along known wildlife travel routes, recorded occurrences of ~ 20 other animal species. We examined temporal relationships of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and javelina (Pecari tajacu) to landscape phenology (as measured by monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data) and the timing of wildfire (Alambre Fire of 2007). Mixed model analyses suggest that temporal dynamics of these two species were related to vegetation phenology and natural disturbance in the Sky Island region, information important for wildlife managers faced with uncertainty regarding changing climate and disturbance regimes.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Conference Paper
Publication Subtype Conference Paper
Title Examining wildlife responses to phenology and wildfire using a landscape-scale camera trap network
Year Published 2012
Language English
Publisher U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station
Contributing office(s) Western Geographic Science Center
Description 3 p.
Larger Work Type Conference Paper
Larger Work Title RMRS-P-67
First page 503
Last page 505
Conference Title Merging science and management in a rapidly changing world: Biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago III and 7th Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts
Conference Location Tucson, Arizona
Conference Date May 1-5, 2012
Country United States
State Arizona
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N