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Thiaminase activity and life history investigations in American Shad in the Columbia river

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Abstract

American shad <i>Alosa sapidissima</i> fry were successfully transplanted from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast in 1871 and have subsequently proliferated. The Columbia River population is in the millions, yet few investigations have been conducted to better understand their life history, population dynamics, or potential impacts on other species. In 2007 and 2008 we captured American shad from the Columbia River to assess levels of thiaminase activity and to characterize some aspects of American shad life history. Thiaminase levels in age-0 and adult fish were high and ranged from 4,113-20,874 pmol/g/min. Ages of spawning American shad ranged from 3-7 years and iteroparity was approximately 33-36% in the spawning population. Males were typically younger and smaller and had a higher degree of iteroparity than females

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Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Thiaminase activity and life history investigations in American Shad in the Columbia river
Year Published 2011
Language English
Publisher Western Fisheries Research Center
Publisher location Reston, VA
Description 17 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Title Impact of American Shad in the Columbia River
Country United States
Other Geospatial Columbia River
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N