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The influence of sea-level rise on fringing reef sediment dynamics: field observations and numerical modeling

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Abstract

While most climate projections suggest that sea level may rise on the order of 0.5-1.0 m by 2100, it is not clear how fluid flow and sediment transport on fringing reefs might change in response to this rapid sea-level rise. Field observations and numerical modeling suggest that an increase in water depth on the order of 0.5-1.0 m on a fringing reef flat would result in larger significant wave heights and wave-driven shear stresses, which, in turn, would result in an increase in both the size and quantity of sediment that can be resuspended from the seabed or eroded from coastal plain deposits. Greater wave- and wind-driven currents would develop on the reef flat with increasing water depth, increasing the offshore flux of water and sediment from the inner reef flat to the outer reef flat and fore reef where coral growth is typically greatest.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Conference Paper
Publication Subtype Conference Paper
Title The influence of sea-level rise on fringing reef sediment dynamics: field observations and numerical modeling
Year Published 2011
Language English
Publisher World Scientific
Contributing office(s) Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center
Description 14 p.
Larger Work Type Conference Paper
Larger Work Title The proceedings of the Coastal Sediments 2011
Conference Title 7th International Symposium on Coastal Engineering and Science of Coastal Sediment Processes
Conference Location Miami, Florida
Conference Date May 2-6, 2011
Country United States
State Hawaii
Other Geospatial Molokai, Hawaii,
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N