Overview and status of the witchweed (striga asiatica) eradication program in the Carolinas

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Abstract

Witchweed [(Striga asiatica (L.) O. Kuntze)] is a parasitic weed from Asia and Africa that attaches to the roots of grasses and grass crops such as corn and sorghum. Witchweed was first detected in the western hemisphere in a corn field in Columbus County, North Carolina, in July, 1956. Since that time, a federal/state cooperative program has eliminated over 99% of the 432,000+ acres that have been found infested with witchweed in the eastern Carolinas. This chapter provides an overview of the USDA-Carolinas Witchweed Eradication Program, as well as the methods and procedures that have been employed to achieve this remarkable level of success.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Overview and status of the witchweed (striga asiatica) eradication program in the Carolinas
DOI 10.1021/bk-2011-1073.ch006
Year Published 2011
Language English
Publisher American Chemical Society
Publisher location Washington, D.C.
Contributing office(s) National Wetlands Research Center
Description 18 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Title Invasive Plant Management Issues and Challenges in the United States: 2011 Overview
First page 51
Last page 68
Country United States
Other Geospatial Carolinas
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N