Use of Argon, Corona, and Landsat imagery to assess 30 years of land resource changes in west-central Senegal

Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing
By: , and 

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Abstract

Over the past 35 years, an agricultural area of west-central Senegal has experienced rapid population growth, fast expansion of agricultural lands, a decline in rainfall, and degradation of vegetative and soil resources. Although such changes have not escaped the attention of Senegal's people, its government, and the scientific community the ability to monitor and quantify land resource trends of recent decades has been difficult. Recently available high-resolution satellite photographs from the American Argon and Corona Programs provide coverage of Senegal back to 1963. The photographs make it possible to study and map land resources at the beginning of the Space Age. In this study, we characterize the changes that have occurred in the region from the early 1960s to the mid-1 990s. Early Argon and Corona photographs are used to reconstruct the historical land use and land cover; comparisons are made with assessments from recent Landsat images. Field studies and aerial surveys provide additional insight. The forces of change, driven primarily by population growth and unsustainable agricultural practices, are examined

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Use of Argon, Corona, and Landsat imagery to assess 30 years of land resource changes in west-central Senegal
Series title Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing
Volume 66
Issue 6
Year Published 2000
Language English
Publisher ASPRS
Contributing office(s) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center
Description 9 p.
First page 727
Last page 735
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N