Science foundation Chapter 5 Appendix 5.1: Case study california ridgway's rail (Rallus obseoletus obsoletus)

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Abstract

The clapper rail (Rallus longirostris) recently was split into two sister groups (Chesser et al. 2014) on the basis of phylogenetic analyses (Maley and Brumfield 2013). The original grouping is now represented on the East Coast of North America by the Clapper rail (Rallus crepitans) and on the West Coast by the Ridgway’s rail (Rallus obsoletus). The California Ridgeway’s rail (Rallus obsoletus obsoletus; hereafter California rail) is the largest of 3 Ridgway’s rail subspecies which also include R. o. levipes (light-footed rail) and R. o. yumanensis (Yuma rail) (Eddleman and Conway 1994). The California rail is also the largest resident terrestrial vertebrate that lives solely in San Francisco Bay salt marshes. Formerly present in salt marsh along the California coast from Morro Bay to Humboldt Bay, by the early 1970s the California rail was breeding only in Elkhorn Slough and San Francisco Bay (Gill 1979). Population declines throughout the 19th and 20th centuries were attributed predominately to land conversion, development, and fragmentation of marshlands (USFWS 2013). However, exotic predators such as red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) are also implicated in population declines (USFWS 2013).

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Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype Other Government Series
Title Science foundation Chapter 5 Appendix 5.1: Case study california ridgway's rail (Rallus obseoletus obsoletus)
Year Published 2015
Language English
Publisher California State Coastal Conservancy
Contributing office(s) Western Ecological Research Center
Description 9 p.
Larger Work Type Report
Larger Work Subtype Other Report
Larger Work Title The baylands and climate change what we can do: Baylands ecosystem habitat goals science update 2015
Country United States
State California
Other Geospatial San Francisco Bay