Rapidly spreading seagrass invades the Caribbean with unknown ecological consequences

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
By: , and 

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Abstract

The non-native seagrass Halophila stipulacea has spread rapidly throughout the Caribbean Sea (Willette et al. 2014); without additional research, the ecological ramifications of this invasion are difficult to predict. Biodiversity, connectivity of marine ecosystems, and recovery of degraded coral reefs could all be affected. The invasive seagrass, native to the Red Sea and Indian Ocean, has taken over sand bottoms and intermixed with or replaced native seagrasses, including Thalassia testudinum, Syringodium filiforme, and Halodule wrightii.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Rapidly spreading seagrass invades the Caribbean with unknown ecological consequences
Series title Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
DOI 10.1890/14.WB.016
Volume 12
Issue 10
Year Published 2014
Language English
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Contributing office(s) Wetland and Aquatic Research Center
Description 2 p.
First page 546
Last page 547
Other Geospatial Caribbean Sea
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N