Effect of septic-tank wastes on quality of water, Ipswich and Shawsheen River basins, Massachusetts

Journal of Research of the U.S. Geological Survey
By:  and 

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Abstract

Many housing projects in the metropolitan area of Boston are beyond the reach of municipal sewer systems. Waste water disposed of through septic-tank or cesspool systems percolates to ground-water reservoirs and eventually reaches the streams. The dissolved-solids load in the streams receiving septic-tank effluent is increased by an amount that can be predicted from the housing density. In the study area, highway deicing salts are the only materials other than septic-tank discharge that contribute to water-quality degradation. The effect of these salts on the relationship with housing density is eliminated by subtracting the specific conductance due to sodium chloride from the measured specific conductance of a water sample. The difference is called residual conductance and is proportional to the dissolved-solids content minus the concentration of sodium chloride.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Effect of septic-tank wastes on quality of water, Ipswich and Shawsheen River basins, Massachusetts
Series title Journal of Research of the U.S. Geological Survey
Volume 1
Issue 1
Year Published 1973
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Reston, VA
Description 4 p.
First page 117
Last page 120
Country United States of America
State Massachusetts
Other Geospatial Ipswich and Shawsheen River Basins
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N
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