Assessing the tolerance of fish and fish populations to environmental stress: The problems and methods of monitoring

By: , and 
Edited by: V.W. CarinsP.V. Hodson, and J. Nriagu

Links

Abstract

Environmental stress is an inescapable aspect of life in the aquatic environment. The chemical and physical demands of life underwater impose somewhat rigorous constraints on aquatic species (Smith, 1982a). Superimposed on such demands may be the additional. physiological constraints of particular ecological niches. It is true that aquatic species are adapted to these conditions, but this does not imply the absence of energy drains (Lugo, 1978). For example, thermophilic fishes must still cope physiologically with the demands of high temperatures even though they are adapted to high temperatures per se.
Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Assessing the tolerance of fish and fish populations to environmental stress: The problems and methods of monitoring
Chapter 12
Year Published 1984
Language English
Publisher John Wiley and Sons
Contributing office(s) Western Fisheries Research Center
Description 32 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Contaminant effects on fisheries
First page 164
Last page 195
Google Analytic Metrics Metrics page
Additional publication details