Earthquake probabilities for the Wassatch front region in Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming

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Abstract

In a letter to The Salt Lake Daily Tribune in September 1883, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geologist G.K. Gilbert warned local residents about the implications of observable fault scarps along the western base of the Wasatch Range. The scarps were evidence that large surface-rupturing earthquakes had occurred in the past and more would likely occur in the future. The main actor in this drama is the 350-km-long Wasatch fault zone (WFZ), which extends from central Utah to southernmost Idaho. The modern Wasatch Front urban corridor, which follows the valleys on the WFZ’s hanging wall between Brigham City and Nephi, is home to nearly 80% of Utah’s population of 3 million. Adding to this circumstance of “lots of eggs in one basket,” more than 75% of Utah’s economy is concentrated along the Wasatch Front in Utah’s four largest counties, literally astride the five central and most active segments of the WFZ.

Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype Other Government Series
Title Earthquake probabilities for the Wassatch front region in Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming
Year Published 2016
Language English
Publisher Utah Geological Survey
Contributing office(s) Geologic Hazards Science Center
Description xiv., 164 p. Appendixes A-E