Genetic differences in growth and survival of juvenile hatchery and wild steelhead trout, Salmo gairdneri

Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada
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Abstract

Relative growth and survival of offspring from matings of hatchery and wild Deschutes River (Oregon) summer steelhead trout, Salmo gairdneri, were measured to determine if hatchery fish differ genetically from wild fish in traits that can affect the stock–recruitment relationship of wild populations. Sections of four natural streams and a hatchery pond were each stocked with genetically marked (lactate dehydrogenase genotypes) eyed eggs or unfed swim-up fry from each of three matings: hatchery × hatchery (HH), hatchery × wild (HW), and wild × wild (WW). In streams, WW fish had the highest survival and HW fish the highest growth rates when significant differences were found; in the hatchery pond, HH fish had the highest survival and growth rates. The hatchery fish were genetically different from wild fish and when they interbreed with wild fish may reduce the number of smolts produced. Hatchery procedures can be modified to reduce the genetic differences between hatchery and wild fish.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Genetic differences in growth and survival of juvenile hatchery and wild steelhead trout, Salmo gairdneri
Series title Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada
DOI 10.1139/f77-015
Volume 34
Issue 1
Year Published 1997
Language English
Publisher Canadian Science Publishing
Contributing office(s) Western Fisheries Research Center
Description 6 p.
First page 123
Last page 128
Country United States
State Oregon
Other Geospatial Deschutes River