Mangroves, hurricanes, and lightning strikes: Assessment of Hurricane Andrew suggests an interaction across two differing scales of disturbance

BioScience
By: , and 

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Abstract

The track of Hurricane Andrew carried it across one of the most extensive mangrove for ests in the New World. Although it is well known that hurricanes affect mangrove forests, surprisingly little quantitative information exists concerning hurricane impact on forest structure, succession, species composition, and dynamics of mangrove-dependent fauna or on rates of eco-system recovery (see Craighead and Gilbert 1962, Roth 1992, Smith 1992, Smith and Duke 1987, Stoddart 1969).

After Hurricane Andrew's passage across south Florida, we assessed the environmental damage to the natural resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks. Quantitative data collected during subsequent field trips (October 1992 to July 1993) are also provided. We present measurements of initial tree mortality by species and size class, estimates of delayed (or continuing) tree mortality, and observations of geomorphological changes along the coast and in the forests that could influence the course of forest recovery. We discuss a potential interaction across two differing scales of disturbance within mangrove forest systems: hurricanes and lightning strikes.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Mangroves, hurricanes, and lightning strikes: Assessment of Hurricane Andrew suggests an interaction across two differing scales of disturbance
Series title BioScience
DOI 10.2307/1312230
Volume 44
Issue 4
Year Published 1994
Language English
Publisher Oxford University Press
Contributing office(s) Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Southeast Ecological Science Center
Description 7 p.
First page 256
Last page 262
Country United States
State Florida
Other Geospatial Biscayne National Park, Everglades National Park
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N