Immune and endocrine responses of adult spring Chinook salmon during freshwater migration and sexual maturation

Fish and Shellfish Immunology
By: , and 

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Abstract

The immune –endocrine responses in spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined during their freshwater migration and final maturation. In 1990, migrating fish had high plasma cortisol titres (means 200 ng ml−1) and generated relatively few antibody-producing cells (APC) from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) (100 –200 per culture). After three weeks acclimation in constant environmental conditions, plasma cortisol was reduced and APC increased. There were no changes in number or affinity of glucocorticoid receptors. Concentrations of several sex steroids correlated with APC in females, but there were no such correlations in males. In 1993, fish in a hatchery had significantly greater cortisol concentrations in primary circulation than in secondary circulation, but sex steroid concentrations did not differ between circulations. Mean lysozyme activity in the primary and secondary circulation did not differ in June. In August, activity in the primary circulation was significantly less than that of the secondary, perhaps the result of acute stress associated with sampling. While some sex steroids correlated with lysozyme activity, the fact that in both years all endocrine and immune variables that correlated with each other also correlated with the date of sample, raises the question as to whether or not these are cause-and-effect relations.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Immune and endocrine responses of adult spring Chinook salmon during freshwater migration and sexual maturation
Series title Fish and Shellfish Immunology
DOI 10.1006/fsim.1996.0022
Volume 6
Issue 3
Year Published 1996
Language English
Publisher Academic Press
Contributing office(s) Western Fisheries Research Center
Description 13 p.
First page 221
Last page 233