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Climbing in the high volcanoes of central Mexico

Earthquake Information Bulletin (USGS)
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Abstract

A chain of volcanoes extends across central Mexico along the 19th parallel, a line just south of Mexico City. The westernmost of these peaks is Nevado de Colima at 4,636 feet above sea level. A subsidiary summit of Nevado de Colima is Volcan de Colima, locally called Fuego (fire) it still emits sulphurous fumes and an occasional plume of smoke since its disastrous eruption in 1941. Parictuin, now dormant, was born in the fall of 1943 when a cornfield suddenly erupted. Within 18 months, the cone grew more than 1,700 feet. Nevado de Toluca is a 15,433-foot volcanic peak south of the city of Toluca. Just southeast of Mexico City are two high volcanoes that are permanently covered by snow: Iztaccihuatl (17,342 fet) and Popocatepetl (17,887 feet) Further east is the third highest mountain in North America: 18,700-foot Citlateptl, or El Pico de Orizaba. North of these high peaks are two volcanoes, 14, 436-foot La Malinche and Cofre de Perote at 14,048 feet. This range of mountains is known variously as the Cordillera de Anahuac, the Sierra Volcanica Transversal, or the Cordillera Neovolcanica. 

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Climbing in the high volcanoes of central Mexico
Series title Earthquake Information Bulletin (USGS)
Volume 16
Issue 3
Year Published 1984
Language English
Publisher U.S Geological Survey
Description 11 p.
First page 136
Last page 146
Country Mexico
Other Geospatial Central Mexico
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N