Appraising status of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population by counting females with cubs-of-the-year

Wildlife Society Bulletin
By: , and 

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Abstract

The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horriblilis) in the lower United States was declared threatened in 1975 under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 15-31-1544). According to that Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had to prepare a plan to recover populations to levels where the species could be conserved and delisted from its threatened status. The Recovery Plan (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1993) uses counts of distinct females with cubs-of-the-year as a recovery parameter in several grizzly bear ecosystems. The total number of these females is assumed to be the minimum number with cubs born in the current year. To our knowledge, this technique, its methodology, and value as a population indicator have never been adequately explained or discussed. Thus, we describe the methodology and assess its potential for continued use in the Yellowstone ecosystem.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Appraising status of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population by counting females with cubs-of-the-year
Series title Wildlife Society Bulletin
Volume 23
Issue 2
Year Published 1995
Language English
Publisher Wildlife Society
Publisher location Washington, D.C.
Contributing office(s) Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
Description 4 p.
First page 245
Last page 248
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N