Biological consequences of relocating grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem

Journal of Wildlife Management
By:  and 

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Abstract

Relocating grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) from human/bear conflict situations has been a standard management procedure. Using data from Yellowstone National Park, we present components of situations that may affect the outcome of a relocation. Survival rates of transported bears were lower (lx = 0.83) (P = 0.001) than those not transported (lx = 0.89). Survival was largely affected by whether the bear returned to the capture site (P = 0.029). Return rate was most affected by distance transported (P = 0.012) and age-sex group (P = 0.014). Return rates decreased at distances -75 km, and subadult females returned least (P = 0.050) often. Because of low survival and high return rates, transporting grizzly bears should be considered a final action to eliminate a conflict situation. However, transporting females must be considered a viable management technique because transports of some individuals have resulted in contributions to the population through successful reproduction.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Biological consequences of relocating grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem
Series title Journal of Wildlife Management
DOI 10.2307/3802463
Volume 59
Issue 3
Year Published 1995
Language English
Publisher Wildlife Society
Publisher location Washington, D.C.
Contributing office(s) Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
Description 6 p.
First page 560
Last page 565
Country United States
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N