Rehabilitation of a Species: The Black-Footed Ferret (Mustela nigripes)

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Abstract

Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) are an endangered carnivore endemic to North America.  This small nocturnal member of the weasel family is totally dependent on the prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) ecosystem for survival.  The ferret lives in prairie dog burrows and relies on prairie dogs for 90 percent of its diet (3,21).  Poisoning of prairie dogs was largely responsible for the 98 percent reduction in geographic distribution of prairie dogs; concurrently, black-footed ferret numbers plummeted.  Recently, only a single known population of black-footed ferrets remained.  In 1985 that popuation, located near Meeteetse Wyoming, succumbed to an outbreak of canine distemper, and the few remaining ferrets were taken into captivity in an attempt to save the species through captive progation.

Additional publication details

Publication type Conference Paper
Publication Subtype Conference Paper
Title Rehabilitation of a Species: The Black-Footed Ferret (Mustela nigripes)
Year Published 1991
Language English
Publisher Wildlife Rehabilitation Association
Contributing office(s) Fort Collins Science Center
Description 10 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Conference publication
Larger Work Title Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Wildlife Rehabilitation Association
First page 183
Last page 192
Conference Title Ninth Annual Wildlife Rehabilitation Association
Conference Location Chicago, IL
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N