Invasive reptiles and amphibians: global perspectives and local solutions

Animal Conservation
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Abstract

In the annals of invasive species biology, higher taxa such asmammals, plants and insects have received the lion’s shareof research attention, largely because many of these invadershave demonstrated a remarkable ability to degrade ecosys-tems and cause economic harm. Interest in invasive reptilesand amphibians (collectively ‘herpetofauna’, colloquially‘herps’) has historically lagged but is now garnering in-creased scrutiny as a result of their escalating pace ofinvasion. A few herpetofaunal invaders have received con-siderable attention in scientific and popular accounts, in-cluding the brown treesnakeBoiga irregularison Guam,Burmese pythonPython molurusin Florida, Coqu´ıEleutherodactylus coquiin Hawaii and cane toadBufomarinusin Australia. However, relatively few are aware ofmany emerging and potentially injurious herpetofaunalinvaders, such as Nile monitorsVaranus niloticusin Flor-ida, common kingsnakesLampropeltis getulain the CanaryIslands, boa constrictorsBoa constrictoron Aruba andCozumel, or a variety of giant constrictor snakes in PuertoRico. For the vast majority of the most commonlyintroduced species, real or potential impacts to nativeecosystems or human economic interests are poorly under-stood and incompletely explored; major pathways of intro-duction have only recently been elucidated, and effectivemanagement interventions have been limited (Kraus, 2009).

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Invasive reptiles and amphibians: global perspectives and local solutions
Series title Animal Conservation
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-1795.2010.00409.x
Volume 13
Issue Supplement 1
Year Published 2010
Language English
Publisher Zoological Society of London
Contributing office(s) Fort Collins Science Center
Description 2 p.
First page 3
Last page 4
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N