Groundwater regulation and integrated planning

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Abstract

The complex nature of groundwater and the diversity of uses and environmental interactions call for emerging groundwater problems to be addressed through integrated management and planning approaches. Planning requires different levels of integration dealing with: the hydrologic cycle (the physical process) including the temporal dimension; river basins and aquifers (spatial integration); socioeconomic considerations at regional, national and international levels; and scientific knowledge. The great natural variation in groundwater conditions obviously affects planning needs and options as well as perceptions from highly localised to regionally-based approaches. The scale at which planning is done therefore needs to be carefully evaluated against available policy choices and options in each particular setting. A solid planning approach is based on River Basin Management Planning (RBMP), which covers: (1) objectives that management planning are designed to address; (2) the way various types of measures fit into the overall management planning; and (3) the criteria against which the success or failure of specific strategies or interventions can be evaluated (e.g. compliance with environmental quality standards). A management planning framework is to be conceived as a “living” or iterated document that can be updated, refined and if necessary changed as information and experience are gained. This chapter discusses these aspects, providing an insight into European Union (EU), United States and Australia groundwater planning practices.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Groundwater regulation and integrated planning
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-23576-9_8
Year Published 2016
Language English
Publisher Springer International Publishing
Contributing office(s) Wisconsin Water Science Center
Description 31 p.
First page 197
Last page 227
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N