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Snaring to control feral pigs sus scrofa in a remote Hawaiian rain forest

Biological Conservation

By:
and
https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-3207(93)90712-A

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Abstract

Feral pig Sus scrofa control in Kipahulu Valley, a remote rain forest in Haleakala National Park, Maui, Hawaiian Islands, has been achieved with snares over a 45-month period. Initial pig densities in fenced management units of 6·2 km2 and 7·8 km2were estimated at 6 animals/km2 and 14·3 animals/km2 for the two units, based on population reconstruction from animals killed and aged. During the 45 months of the study, 1978 snares were set, and 1·6 million snare nights were logged. Snare density reached 96/km2 and 200/km2 for the two management units by the end of the study. A mean effort of 43 worker hours/pig was used to remove 53 pigs from the upper management unit, and a mean of 7 worker hours/pig to remove 175 animals from the more densely populated lower unit. Pig activity monitoring along transects provided a good measure of control effectiveness until densities of about 1 pig/km2 were achieved, after which transects became less useful than scouting for determining pig activity.

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Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Snaring to control feral pigs sus scrofa in a remote Hawaiian rain forest
Series title:
Biological Conservation
DOI:
10.1016/0006-3207(93)90712-A
Volume:
63
Issue:
3
Year Published:
1993
Language:
English
Publisher:
Elsevier
Publisher location:
Kidlington, Oxford
Contributing office(s):
Pacific Islands Ecosys Research Center
Description:
7 p.
First page:
195
Last page:
201
Country:
United States
State:
Hawai'i
County:
Maui
Other Geospatial:
Kipahulu Valley