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Amphibian dynamics in constructed ponds on a wildlife refuge: developing expected responses to hydrological restoration

Hydrobiologia

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DOI:10.1007/s10750-016-2979-0

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Abstract

Management actions are based upon predictable responses. To form expected responses to restoration actions, I estimated habitat relationships and trends (2002–2015) for four pond-breeding amphibians on a wildlife refuge (Montana, USA) where changes to restore historical hydrology to the system greatly expanded (≥8 times) the flooded area of the primary breeding site for western toads (Anaxyrus boreas). Additional restoration actions are planned for the near future, including removing ponds that provide amphibian habitat. Multi-season occupancy models based on data from 15 ponds sampled during 7 years revealed that the number of breeding subpopulations increased modestly for Columbia spotted frogs (Rana luteiventris) and was stationary for long-toed salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and Pacific treefrogs (Pseudacris regilla). For these three species, pond depth was the characteristic that was associated most frequently with occupancy or changes in colonization and extinction. In contrast, a large decrease in colonization by western toads explained the decline from eight occupied ponds in 2002 to two ponds in 2015. This decline occurred despite an increase in wetland area and the colonization of a newly created pond. These changes highlight the challenges of managing for multiple species and how management responses can be unpredictable, possibly reducing the efficacy of targeted actions.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Amphibian dynamics in constructed ponds on a wildlife refuge: developing expected responses to hydrological restoration
Series title:
Hydrobiologia
DOI:
10.1007/s10750-016-2979-0
Volume:
790
Issue:
1
Year Published:
2017
Language:
English
Publisher:
Springer
Contributing office(s):
Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
Description:
11 p.
First page:
23
Last page:
33