Contaminants without borders: A regional assessment of the Colorado River Delta ecosystem

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Abstract

The Colorado River Delta Region (CRDR) is comprised of large agricultural areas in the U.S. (Imperial and Yuma districts) and Mexico (Mexicali and San Luis districts), the Salton Sea, and the Lower Colorado River from southern Arizona to the Gulf of California (Valdés-Casillas et al., 1998). Before agricultural development, the lower delta comprised large riparian and wetland areas (Sykes, 1937; Glenn et al., 1999). Currently, most water from the Colorado River below Imperial Dam is used for irrigation in California and Mexico, and only remnants of the former CRDR wetlands remain. However, the Cienega de Santa Clara and the Rio Hardy wetlands (Figure 111.1) provide important habitat for many resident and migratory birds, including endangered species such as the desert pupfish (scientific names are provided in Table 111.1) and the Yuma clapper rail (Abarca et al., 1993; Mellink et al., 1997). Detailed descriptions of the CRDR and its wetlands are provided elsewhere (Sykes, 1937; Glenn et al., 1995; 1999; Friederici, 1998; Valdés-Casillas et al., 1998).

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Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Title Contaminants without borders: A regional assessment of the Colorado River Delta ecosystem
Chapter 111
ISBN 9781566706124
Year Published 2002
Language English
Publisher CRC Press
Contributing office(s) Columbia Environmental Research Center
Description 10 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Managing for healthy ecosystems
First page 1125
Last page 1134
Country Mexico, United States
State California
Other Geospatial Colorado River Delta Region