Decreased survival of rainbow trout exposed to no. 2 fuel oil caused by sublethal preexposure

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
By: , and 

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Abstract

Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed for 21 d to sublethal levels of No. 2 fuel oil (2FO). The four exposure concentrations ranged from 12 to 100 mg/L 2FO dispersed in water and resulted in 0 to 12% mortality. Following this exposure period (preexposure) the ability of preexposed trout to survive exposure to acutely lethal levels of 2FO was observed. Preexposure to either 50 or 100 mg/L 2FO consistently resulted in decreased survival and a lower LC50 for a given observation period. Unfortunately, because the LC50 determinations were not obtained independently, they could not be used to test statistically the effects of preexposure on survival. Therefore, two proportional hazard modeling techniques were applied to the data to test for effects due to preexposure. Both modeling techniques indicated that preexposure results in decreased survival of rainbow trout exposed to acutely toxic levels of 2FO. Thus, in contrast to preexposure to metals, which results in acclimation, preexposure to 2FO results in decreased survival.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Decreased survival of rainbow trout exposed to no. 2 fuel oil caused by sublethal preexposure
Series title Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
DOI 10.1002/etc.5620100308
Volume 10
Issue 3
Year Published 1991
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) Columbia Environmental Research Center
Description 9 p.
First page 355
Last page 363