Impact of selenium and other trace elements on the endangered adult razorback sucker

Environmental Toxicology
By: , and 

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Abstract

A study was conducted with endangered the razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) to determine if environmental exposure to selenium in flooded bottomland sites affected survival, growth, and egg-hatching success. Adults were stocked at three sites adjacent to the Colorado River near Grand Junction, Colorado, in July 1996: hatchery ponds at Horsethief Canyon State Wildlife Area (referred to here as Horsethief; the reference site), a diked tertiary channel at Adobe Creek, and North Pond at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA). Fish were collected in April 1997 and spawned. After two spawnings adults from the three sites were held at Horsethief for an 86-day selenium depuration period. Selenium concentrations at Horsethief were 1.4–3.0 μg/L in water, 0.8–0.9 μg/g in sediment, 4.5 μg/g in muscle plug, and 6.0 μg/g in eggs; at Adobe Creek, <0.7–4.5 μg/L in water, 1.2–2.5 μg/g in sediment, 16–20 μg/g in zooplankton, 9.6 μg/g in muscle plug, and 40 μg/g in eggs; and at North Pond, 3.2–17 μg/L in water, 16–94 μg/g in sediment, 32–48 μg/g in zooplankton, 14 μg/g in muscle plug, and 55 μg/g in eggs. During the depuration period, when adults from Adobe Creek and North Pond were held at Horsethief, the fish lost 7%–13% of their selenium burden in 59 days and 14%–21% in 86 days. Larvae from North Pond adults had the most deformities, followed by Adobe Creek adults, with the fewest deformities found in the Horsethief adults.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Impact of selenium and other trace elements on the endangered adult razorback sucker
Series title Environmental Toxicology
DOI 10.1002/tox.10064
Volume 17
Issue 4
Year Published 2002
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) Columbia Environmental Research Center
Description 27 p.
First page 297
Last page 323
Country United States
State Colorado