Effect of dietary vitamin E and selenium on growth, survival and the prevalence of Renibacterium salmoninarum infection in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

Aquaculture
By: , and 

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Abstract

Groups of juvenile spring chinook salmon naturally infected with Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, were fed diets containing different levels of vitamin E and selenium for 214 days in fresh water and 110 days in seawater. The fish were fed vitamin E at concentrations of either 53±3 mg (designated e) or 299±9 mg (designated E) α-tocopheryl acetate equivalence/kg dry diet in combination with sodium selenite to give selenium concentrations of either 0.038±0.008 mg (designated s) or 2.49±0.15 mg (designated S)/kg dry diet. No mortality occurred in the group fed the SE diet, whereas mortality was 3% in the groups fed the sE and Se diets, and 31% in the group fed the se diet. At the end of the experiment, weight gain and hematocrit values were significantly greater in those fish fed the E diets compared with those fed the e diets, whereas the hepato-somatic index was significantly higher in fish fed the e diets. Glutathione peroxidase activity in blood plasma was significantly higher in fish fed the S diets compared with those fed the sdiets. No definite effect of dietary vitamin E and selenium on the prevalence and severity of natural R. salmoninarum infections was demonstrated.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Effect of dietary vitamin E and selenium on growth, survival and the prevalence of Renibacterium salmoninarum infection in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)
Series title Aquaculture
DOI 10.1016/0044-8486(94)90269-0
Volume 121
Issue 4
Year Published 1994
Language English
Publisher Elsevier
Contributing office(s) Western Fisheries Research Center
Description 16 p.
First page 343
Last page 358
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