Riparian restoration in the context of Tamarix control in the western United States: Chapter 23

By: , and 
Edited by: Anna Sher and Martin F. Quigley

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Abstract

This chapter focuses on the restoration of riparian systems in the context of Tamarix control—that is, Tamarix-dominated sites are converted to a replacement vegetation type that achieves specific management goals and helps return parts of the system to a desired and more natural state or dynamic. It reviews research related to restoring native riparian vegetation following tamarix control or removal. The chapter begins with an overview of objective setting and the planning of tamarix control and proceeds by emphasizing the importance of considering site-specific factors and of context in selecting and prioritizing sites for restoration. In particular, it considers valley and bottomland geomorphology, along with river flow regime and associated fluvial disturbance, surface water and groundwater availability, and soil salinity and texture. The chapter concludes with a discussion of costs and benefits associated with active, passive, and combined ecological restoration approaches, as well as the key issues to consider in carrying out restoration projects at a range of scales.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Riparian restoration in the context of Tamarix control in the western United States: Chapter 23
DOI 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199898206.003.0023
Year Published 2013
Language English
Publisher Oxford University Press
Contributing office(s) Fort Collins Science Center
Description 22 p.
First page 404
Last page 425