Diversity increases biomass production for trematode parasites in snails

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
By: , and 

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Abstract

Increasing species diversity typically increases biomass in experimental assemblages. But there is uncertainty concerning the mechanisms of diversity effects and whether experimental findings are relevant to ecological process in nature. Hosts for parasites provide natural, discrete replicates of parasite assemblages. We considered how diversity affects standing-stock biomass for a highly interactive parasite guild: trematode parasitic castrators in snails. In 185 naturally occurring habitat replicates (individual hosts), diverse parasite assemblages had greater biomass than single-species assemblages, including those of their most productive species. Additionally, positive diversity effects strengthened as species segregated along a secondary niche axis (space). The most subordinate species—also the most productive when alone—altered the general positive effect, and was associated with negative diversity effects on biomass. These findings, on a previously unstudied consumer class, extend previous research to illustrate that functional diversity and species identity may generally both explain how diversity influences biomass production in natural assemblages of competing species.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Diversity increases biomass production for trematode parasites in snails
Series title Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2008.0875
Volume 275
Issue 1652
Year Published 2008
Language English
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Contributing office(s) Western Ecological Research Center
Description 8 p.
First page 2707
Last page 2714