Distribution and abundance of Saltcedar and Russian Olive in the western United States: Chapter 2

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Abstract

Public Law 109-320 calls for “…an assessment of the extent of saltcedar and Russian olive infestation on public and private land in the western United States.” Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.; also known as tamarisk) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) are now frequent and abundant components of the woody riparian vegetation along many Western U.S. rivers (Friedman and others, 2005; Ringold and others, 2008). Management strategies for dealing with these two species require knowledge of their distribution (extent of spread), abundance, and the ecological conditions that favor or hinder their spread or persistence. This chapter reviews the literature on five key areas related to the extent of saltcedar and Russian olive in the Western United States: (1) the history of introduction, planting, and spread; (2) current distribution; (3) current abundance; (4) factors that control current distribution and abundance; and (5) models to predict future distribution and abundance.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Distribution and abundance of Saltcedar and Russian Olive in the western United States: Chapter 2
Year Published 2010
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Reston, VA
Contributing office(s) Fort Collins Science Center
Description 21 p.
Larger Work Type Report
Larger Work Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Larger Work Title Saltcedar and Russian Olive Control Demonstration Act Science Assessment (Scientific Investigations Report 2009–5247)
First page 11
Last page 31