A model project for exploring the role of sustainability science in a citizen-centered, collaborative decision-making process

Human Ecology Review
By:  and 

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Abstract

The role of science in society is evolving as we enter the 21st century. The report, Science — The Endless Frontier (Bush 1990[1945]), outlined a model of national scientific research that served the country for 50 years. The contract between science and society established in that report stipulated that science is essential and that basic research meets national needs (Pielke and Byerly 1998). This stipulation and the abundant — seemingly unlimited and unquestioned — funding for research during the Cold War caused many scientists to come to believe that funding for science was an entitlement independent of societal needs. Implicit in this belief is that science alone can solve society’s problems. We now are learning that many policy issues that involve science involve diverse economic, political, social, and aesthetic values as well, and rarely, if ever, is scientific information alone the basis of public policy (e.g., see Sarewitz 1996a, 1996b; Frodeman 1997). Moreover, resources are increasingly more limited and many in society are questioning the value of public-supported science.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title A model project for exploring the role of sustainability science in a citizen-centered, collaborative decision-making process
Series title Human Ecology Review
Volume 9
Issue 1
Year Published 2002
Language English
Publisher Society for Human Ecology
Publisher location Bar Harbor, ME
Contributing office(s) Western Geographic Science Center
Description 5 p.
First page 67
Last page 71
Country United States