Incubation rhythm in the Fulmar Fulmarus glacialis: Annual variation and sex roles

Ibis
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Abstract

I monitored the incubation schedules of Fulmars Fulmarus glacialis in an Alaskan colony by observing nests where the male and female were of different colour phases. Complete shifts of up to 16 days were recorded; the average shift in mid-incubation was 4–6 days. Mean shift length was inversely correlated with hatching success in 5 years, suggesting that Fulmars adjusted their foraging patterns to annual differences in food availability. Males assumed the larger share (55%) of incubation on average, and a larger share in years with lower hatching success. Serial correlation in the length of incubation shifts had two components - the influence of prior shift lengths on time spent foraging and individual variation. Failure of the male to relieve the female soon after laying resulted in a few breeding failures and egg losses were associated with exceptionally long shifts throughout incubation.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Incubation rhythm in the Fulmar Fulmarus glacialis: Annual variation and sex roles
Series title Ibis
DOI 10.1111/j.1474-919X.1990.tb00275.x
Volume 132
Issue 4
Year Published 1990
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center
Description 10 p.
First page 515
Last page 524
Country United States
State Alaska
Other Geospatial Semidi Islands