Preparing future fisheries professionals to make good decisions

Fisheries
By:  and 

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Abstract

Future fisheries professionals will face decision-making challenges in an increasingly complex field of fisheries management. Though fisheries students are well trained in the use of the scientific method to understand the natural world, they are rarely exposed to structured decision making (SDM) as part of an undergraduate or graduate education. Specifically, SDM encourages users (e.g., students, managers) to think critically and communicate the problem and then identify specific, measurable objectives as they relate to the problem. Next, users must think critically and creatively about management alternatives that can be used to meet the objectives—there must be more than one alternative or there is no decision to be made. Lastly, the management alternatives are evaluated with regard to how likely they are to succeed in terms of multiple, possibly completing, objectives, such as how stakeholder groups value outcomes of management actions versus monetary cost. We believe that exposure to SDM and its elements is an important part of preparing future fisheries professional to meet the challenges they may face. These challenges include reduced budgets, the growth of potentially competing natural resource interest groups, and stakeholder desire to be involved in management decisions affecting public trust resources, just to name a few.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Preparing future fisheries professionals to make good decisions
Series title Fisheries
DOI 10.1080/03632415.2016.1199233
Volume 41
Issue 8
Year Published 2017
Language English
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Contributing office(s) Coop Res Unit Seattle
Description 2 p.
First page 473
Last page 474