Habitat use by nesting and brood rearing northern pintails on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

Journal of Wildlife Management
By: , and 

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Abstract

We studied habitat use by nesting and brood-rearing northern pintails (Anas acuta) on the coastal Yukon-Kuskokwim (Y-K) Delta, 1991-93. We used a digital habitat map constructed from color infrared aerial photos to assign habitat types to nest and brood locations and estimate habitat availability. Sixty-nine percent of females nested on slough banks in highly saline, tidally influenced habitats where we observed few mammalian predators. Nesting pintails likely preferred slough banks because they were higher and well drained early in the nesting season. Radiomarked females selected moderately saline habitats that were only occasionally or rarely influenced by tides for brood rearing. Eighty percent of females that nested in saline habitats moved their broods to less saline habitats, and those that nested in preferred brood-rearing habitats never moved to more saline habitats to rear their broods. Managers should be aware that in coastal wetlands the proximity of good-quality nesting and brood rearing habitats is important, and the distribution of nesting pintails may not reflect the distribution of broods and vice versa.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Habitat use by nesting and brood rearing northern pintails on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska
Series title Journal of Wildlife Management
DOI 10.2307/3802117
Volume 61
Issue 4
Year Published 1997
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center Biology WTEB, Coop Res Unit Atlanta, Alaska Science Center
Description 9 p.
First page 1199
Last page 1207
Country United States
State Alaska
Other Geospatial Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta