Environmental implications of the use of sulfidic back-bay sediments for dune reconstruction — Lessons learned post Hurricane Sandy

Marine Pollution Bulletin
By: , and 

Links

Abstract

Some barrier-island dunes damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Sandy's storm surges in October 2012 have been reconstructed using sediments dredged from back bays. These sand-, clay-, and iron sulfide-rich sediments were used to make berm-like cores for the reconstructed dunes, which were then covered by beach sand. In November 2013, we sampled and analyzed partially weathered materials collected from the cores of reconstructed dunes. There are generally low levels of metal toxicants in the reconstructed dune materials. However oxidation of reactive iron sulfides by percolating rainwater produces acid-sulfate pore waters, which evaporate during dry periods to produce efflorescent gypsum and sodium jarosite salts. The results suggest use of sulfidic sediments in dune reconstruction has both drawbacks (e.g., potential to generate acid runoff from dune cores following rainfall, enhanced corrosion of steel bulwarks) and possible benefits (e.g., efflorescent salts may enhance structural integrity).

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Environmental implications of the use of sulfidic back-bay sediments for dune reconstruction — Lessons learned post Hurricane Sandy
Series title Marine Pollution Bulletin
DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.04.051
Volume 107
Issue 2
Year Published 2016
Language English
Publisher Elsevier
Contributing office(s) Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Toxic Substances Hydrology Program
Description 13 p.
First page 459
Last page 471
Country United States
State New Jersey