Discovery of a new Kittlitz's murrelet nest: Clues to habitat selection and nest-site fidelity

Northwestern Naturalist
By: , and 

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Abstract

On 13 June 1993, a new Kittlitz's murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris) nest was discovered near Red Mountain on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. The nest was on a 22° slope at about 900 m elevation with a northeast aspect, and contained a 60.2 × 40.6 mm egg that weighed 49.0 g. Downy feathers and weathered fecal material found at the nest indicated re-use from a previous year, suggesting possible nest site fidelity. The nest was located in an area scoured by winds and free of snow during early spring, suggesting that this may be an important mesoscale factor influencing selection of nesting habitat. Proximity to suitable foraging habitat, particularly sheltered bays and glacial river outflows, may affect breeding habitat choice over larger spatial scales.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Discovery of a new Kittlitz's murrelet nest: Clues to habitat selection and nest-site fidelity
Series title Northwestern Naturalist
DOI 10.2307/3536627
Volume 80
Issue 1
Year Published 1999
Language English
Publisher Society for Northwestern Vertebrate Biology
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center
Description 6 p.
First page 8
Last page 13
Country United States
State Alaska
Other Geospatial Kenai Peninsula, Red Mountain