Detectability, philopatry, and the distribution of dispersal distances in vertebrates

Trends in Ecology and Evolution
By: , and 

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Abstract

Dispersal is of central importance to population biology, behavioral ecology and conservation. However, because field studies are based on finite study areas, nearly all dispersal distributions for vertebrates currently available are biased, often highly so. The inadequacy of dispersal data obtained directly by traditional methods using population studies of marked individuals is highlighted by comparing the resulting distributions with dispersal estimates obtained by radio-tracking and by using genetic estimates of gene flow.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Detectability, philopatry, and the distribution of dispersal distances in vertebrates
Series title Trends in Ecology and Evolution
DOI 10.1016/S0169-5347(96)20074-6
Volume 11
Issue 12
Year Published 1996
Language English
Publisher Elsevier
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center
Description 4 p.
First page 514
Last page 517