Chemical changes in an industrial waste liquid during post-injection movement in a limestone aquifer, Pensacola, Florida

Groundwater
By: , and 

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Abstract

An industrial waste liquid containing organonitrile compounds and nitrate ion has been injected into the lower limestone of the Floridan aquifer near Pensacola, Florida since June 1975. Chemical analyses of water from monitor wells and backflow from the injection well indicate that organic carbon compounds are converted to CO2 and nitrate is converted to N2. These transformations are caused by bacteria immediately after injection, and are virtually completed within 100 m of the injection well. The zone near the injection well behaves like an anaerobic filter with nitrate respiring bacteria dominating the microbial flora in this zone.

Sodium thiocyanate contained in the waste is unaltered during passage through the injection zone and is used to detect the degree of mixing of injected waste liquid with native water at a monitor well 312 m (712 ft) from the injection well. The dispersivity of the injection zone was calculated to be 10 m (33 ft). Analyses of samples from the monitor well indicate 80 percent reduction in chemical oxygen demand and virtually complete loss of organonitriles and nitrate from the waste liquid during passage from the injection well to the monitor well. Bacterial densities were much lower at the monitor well than in backflow from the injection well.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Chemical changes in an industrial waste liquid during post-injection movement in a limestone aquifer, Pensacola, Florida
Series title Groundwater
DOI 10.1111/j.1745-6584.1979.tb03357.x
Volume 17
Issue 6
Year Published 1979
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) Toxic Substances Hydrology Program
Description 12 p.
First page 562
Last page 573
Country United States
State Florida
City Pensacola
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