Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an element-specific detector for field-flow fractionation particle separation

Analytical Chemistry
By: , and 

Links

Abstract

An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer was used for the quantitative measurement of trace elements In specific,submicrometer size-fraction particulates, separated by sedimentation field-flow fractionation. Fractions were collected from the eluent of the field-flow fractionation centrifuge and nebulized, with a Babington-type pneumatic nebulizer, into an argon inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. Measured Ion currents were used to quantify the major, minor, and trace element composition of the size-separated colloidal (< 1-microm diameter) particulates. The composition of surface-water suspended matter collected from the Yarra and Darling rivers in Australia is presented to illustrate the usefulness of this tool for characterizing environmental materials. An adsorption experiment was performed using cadmium lon to demonstrate the utility for studying the processes of trace metal-suspended sediment interactions and contaminant transport in natural aquatic systems.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an element-specific detector for field-flow fractionation particle separation
Series title Analytical Chemistry
DOI 10.1021/ac00042a005
Volume 64
Issue 18
Year Published 1992
Language English
Publisher American Chemical Society
Contributing office(s) National Research Program - Central Branch, Toxic Substances Hydrology Program
Description 6 p.
First page 2036
Last page 2041